Seven Shooting Mistakes & How to Fix Them

There are countless reasons that can cause a shot to miss its target. Like numerous skills, shooting requires time and experience to master. But here are some tips to help you along the way. Here are seven mistakes that are quick to fix and can help you improve the accuracy of your shooting, whether it’s a metal target or a deer.

Improper Ring Alignment

If you have actually been lining up scope rings by eye and slapping CVlife scopes on your rifle, you are doing a disservice to the optics. Trying to align with the eye will undoubtedly lead to poor alignment. The rings in front need to be aligned with the rings in the back. Do not estimate, as an incorrect alignment can damage your scope while firing. It can cause dents, making it harder to adjust the scope, and also distort the reticle. Instead, use a level to ensure the scopes is aligned and your accuracy ought to enhance.

Over- & Under-Tightening Screws

You need to be careful with your balance when attaching a scope to the rifle, or your shooting will suffer. Overtighten the screws can damage the scope and break your optic. On the other hand, insufficient tightening means that the scope can move so slightly, making your accuracy less accurate due to recoil. If possible, use an adjustable-torque screwdriver and set the scope to the amount of torque recommended by the manufacturer.

Not Zeroing the Scope

You just added a Red dot sight to your rifle and you're going hunting this weekend. If you don't zero the scope, your aim will undoubtedly misfire. Take the time to zero out the scope and take the time to do the right thing.

Shooting Too Fast

Once you see the target, just like in a Call of Duty game, quickly raise the rifle and shoot, barely passing the scope. Rushing will only reduce your accuracy. Slow down, focus on your breath, use the reticles, and shoot. If you can't see your deer during the window, wait for another opportunity - it's better than missing it and spooking it.

Poor Trigger Technique

Poor trigger technique mess up a shot each time. Pulling the trigger pulls the rifle, making it impossible for you to aim. Instead, use your finger pads instead of your joint to pull evenly. Continued stress is key. It's a controlled squeeze, not a true pull. Practice dry firing and remember to follow through on the trigger squeeze.

Fear of Recoil & Scope Bite

While worry of recoil, just like practice, requires training. You can eliminate scope bites or scope eyes by placing the scope properly. Correctly cheek welding will assist, but if your scope is too near your face it can still strike you on recoil. Your scope ought to relax your eyes and your rifle should fit properly.

Forgetting the Follow-Through

Do not look at the target immediately after shooting. Elevating your cheeks from the rest can lead to a larger grouping. The head can only be moved after the target has been recaptured by the optics.

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